Dog Boredom and Separation Anxiety

Dog Boredom and Separation Anxiety

Remember Gypsy?  The puppy I adopted last November.  Next month she will beGypsy celebrating her first year birthday.  She has come a long way from being that scared and skittish puppy I drove home across three states.  As most GSPs she is very active but also enjoys her downtime more than Simba ever did.  My biggest issue is that she tends to get bored.  While I’m home, she enjoys playing with her toys.  They have a large toy box and she will pull out each one and play with it a while or get Simba to play tug-a-war with her and then she goes for the next one.  They also have a basket with about 50 chew bones which she tends to do the same with.  She also likes to annoy Simba when she tires of entertaining herself.  Simba likes to play when she feels like it and it’s not always when Gypsy feels like it.  The both get along beautifully.  They do play quite a bit, however, Simba is now nine years old and gets tired more.  When I am away from the house, it’s a whole other Continue reading

Healthy Dog Treats

SPINACH, CARROT, & ZUCCHINI DOG TREATS

Simba and Gypsy absolutely love these treats.  I decided to share them because they have been such a hit with them and I feel no guilt giving them more than one because they are all natural and good for them.

FOR THE DELICIOUS AND EASY RECIPE PLEASE GO TO DamnDelicious
Spinach, Carrot & Zucchini Dog Treats Via DamnDelicious

Puppy Mange – Skin Disorder

Puppy Mange – Skin Disorder

GypsyAfter a couple of months of Gypsy being home I noticed that she was beginning to scratch and nibble on herself more and more.  GSP’s are known for having more allergies than other breeds.  When Simba was younger, she too suffered from different skin allergies.  The next couple of weeks, I noticed Gypsy was beginning to show puppy mangebare spots around her face and some spots on her back legs.  Gypsy was diagnosed as having Puppy Mange by her vet after performing skin graphs from a couple of areas.  Puppy Mange (Demodectic Mange” also known as Canine Scabies.  It is caused by Continue reading

Are You Peaking?

GSPS RULE

  • FRONT

    Gypsy was rescued and was suffering from malnutrition.  With time and much love her health improved and now is a very happy puppy.  I hope her siblings were able to all find a loving home.  Gypsy will donate $1.00 from each sale to the local humane society to help take care of others like her.

    Unisex Cotton Tee – $ 19.99

  • BACK

DOG NAIL TRIMMING

trusting paws

by Naomi Heck, M.Ed., CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA

NAIL TRIMMING WITH CHASE

Best Dog Toy

BEST DOG TOY

  Simba and Gypsy are two very active GSPs.  As all GSP owners know, this breed must get all the exercise they need daily or your home will be a war-zone. It will also look like one as told by Simba.  I recently had a full hip replacement.  There was quite a bit of planning for this big occurrence in my life.  First of all, I had to finish fencing off the backyard for Gypsy.  Simba is well behaved and also more mature than Gypsy.  Gypsy is still only 7 months old and I can’t take the chance of her puppy brain taking over and deciding to explore more ground (especially the busy street in the front of the house).  As painful as it was, I finished the fencing.  The next item was installing a doggie door so that they could now go out without needing me to get up every 30 minutes to open the door (every 5 minutes for Gypsy who likes to be controlling/annoying at times).
Installing the doggie door should have only taken ten minutes.  However, once I opened up the wall this is what I found.  Electric wiring in my way, augh.IMG_3162doggie door problem #1

The project took a couple of hours of rewiring resulting with happiness and satisfaction.

IMG_3165

It only took Gypsy a couple of days to get comfortable with going in and out of the doggie door by herself without coaxing.  Simba on the other hand is more apprehensive and always has been.  It took her about a week of going through the door with me holding it open, on my hands and knees on the opposite side of the door with my head through the door as I pleaded with her.  An entertaining  moment for my neighbors who don’t miss anything.

I am glad they have each other to play with.  They usually do a pretty good job wearing themselves out chasing each other around and wrestling like world champions. However, since I have returned from the hospital Simba won’t leave my side.  Gypsy still comes and goes and actually enjoys spending lots of time outdoors trying to find different escape routes.  Simba has always been very intuitive and knows something’s wrong; so there’s no playing or chasing each other around going on.  My son sent us the BazooK-9 that he purchased through Amazon.  What a fantastic and fun contraption, not only for the dogs but me too.  This shoots tennis balls across two rooms with the pull of the trigger and the best part is that you don’t have to bend down to pick the balls up.  All you do is push the barrel over the ball and it scoops it up. When the ball disappears into the barrel Simba just goes insane trying to figure out where it disappeared to all the while making a funny and dramatic whimper cry. Gypsy has never gotten the jist of fetching.  She likes chasing the ball and then prancing around with it in her mouth chasing Simba back and forth who does fetch and return the ball.  They both love it and are getting quite the exercise.  They love it so much that they don’t want to stop playing making Simba whimper for a while when it’s put away.

TRAINING NOT TO PULL

trusting paws

by Naomi Heck, M.Ed., CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA

TRAINING NOT TO PULL

Training Tips For Fear Of Men

trusting paws

by Naomi Heck, M.Ed., CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA

BEHAVIOR ADJUSTMENT TRAINING (BAT) FOR FEAR OF MEN

 

 

Clicker Game-Targeting

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by Naomi Heck, M.Ed., CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA

Barking-Sassing

BARKING-SASSING

by Naomi Heck, M.Ed.,CBCC-KA,CPDT-KA

 When your dog starts his “back-talking” at you, just turn and leave the room withoutDog talk. further talking.  Do it immediately (at the first bark), and resist the temptation to repeat your command or “reason” with him.  Go into another area and close the door behind you if possible to make your point clear. After 20 seconds, come back to him for another chance.  Repeat as needed.  Every time.   And abide by my 10 to 1 Rule – Reward good behavior 10 times more than you correct bad ones.  Teach him what to do instead of barking at you, and reward that replacement behavior more frequently than you would like for 7 straight consecutive days.  Pretty soon, he’ll change his mind when his old behaviors do not pay off or aren’t fun anymore.

trusting paws

by Naomi Heck, M.Ed., CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA